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Saw Palmetto

Saw Palmetto

Treatment Overview

Saw palmetto is a type of palm tree that grows in the southeastern United States.

The berry of the saw palmetto plant contains a compound that may reduce the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland. Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include dribbling after urination and getting up many times during the night to urinate. Some people also use it for chronic pelvic pain, hair loss, migraine, and other conditions.

From the 1870s until 1950, saw palmetto was a common treatment for prostate and other urinary problems. After 1950, saw palmetto was no longer recognized as a drug in the United States. It is still used in Europe as a treatment for BPH.

In the United States, saw palmetto is available as a dietary supplement.

Why It Is Used

Saw palmetto is most often used for symptoms of an enlarged prostate (BPH). Experts disagree on whether saw palmetto improves symptoms of BPH.

Risks

Few problems have been reported among men taking saw palmetto. But some people may experience stomach problems.

Men who have problems urinating should see a doctor to rule out prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is treatable, but treatment may be more successful when you find and treat the cancer as early as possible.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate dietary supplements in the same way it regulates medicines. A dietary supplement can be sold with limited or no research on how well it works.

Always tell your doctor if you are using a dietary supplement or if you are thinking about combining a dietary supplement with your conventional medical treatment. It may not be safe to forgo your conventional medical treatment and rely only on a dietary supplement.

When using dietary supplements, keep in mind the following:

  • Like conventional medicines, dietary supplements may cause side effects, trigger allergic reactions, or interact with prescription and nonprescription medicines or other supplements you might be taking. A side effect or interaction with another medicine or supplement may make other health conditions worse.
  • Dietary supplements may not be standardized in their manufacturing. This means that how well they work or any side effects they cause may differ among brands or even within different lots of the same brand. The form you buy in health food or grocery stores may not be the same as the form used in research.
  • The long-term effects of most dietary supplements, other than vitamins and minerals, are not known. Many dietary supplements are not used long-term.

Credits

Current as of: March 17, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine

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